COVID-19

  • Princeton awards over half-a-million dollars in funding for rapid, novel and actionable COVID-19 research projects

    Friday, Apr 10, 2020
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    With the aim of accelerating solutions to the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, Princeton has awarded University funding for seven new faculty-led research initiatives with strong potential for impact.

    The funding enables faculty and their teams to address crucial questions in biomedical, health-related and fundamental science, as well as policy, social and economic topics. Projects will receive funding of up to $100,000.

  • University staff work 24/7 to support on-campus community during coronavirus pandemic

    Wednesday, Apr 8, 2020
    by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications

    From providing critical medical care to baking a birthday cupcake, Princeton staff members are dedicated to helping students who remain on campus during COVID-19.

    “I’m in awe of the courage and resolve of our on-site, frontline medical and administrative staff: they do not flinch when it matters and work tirelessly to maintain our critical operations. These people inspire.” — John Kolligian, executive director, University Health Services

  • NSF RAPID grant awarded for study of how anxiety affects the spread of COVID-19 information

    Thursday, Apr 2, 2020
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Princeton researchers have been awarded a National Science Foundation RAPID grant to study how anxiety about COVID-19 influences how we learn and share information about the pandemic.

    The NSF's Rapid Response Research (RAPID) program funds proposals that require quick-response research on disasters and unanticipated events.

    What the researchers find could help inform the design of campaigns to enhance communication of accurate information and decrease misinformation during times of crisis.

  • New mathematical model can more effectively track epidemics

    Wednesday, Mar 25, 2020
    by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications

    As COVID-19 spreads worldwide, leaders are relying on mathematical models to make public health and economic decisions.

    A new model developed by Princeton and Carnegie Mellon researchers improves tracking of epidemics by accounting for mutations in diseases. Now, the researchers are working to apply their model to allow leaders to evaluate the effects of countermeasures to epidemics before they deploy them.

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