Data Science

  • Princeton IP accelerator funding awarded to seven promising technologies

    Wednesday, Feb 6, 2019
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Seven innovations with the potential to benefit society and spur the economy have been awarded funding to bridge the gap between laboratory research and the development needed to move promising ideas into the global marketplace.

  • Griffiths receives Troland prize from the National Academy of Sciences

    Wednesday, Jan 23, 2019
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    The National Academy of Sciences announced today that Thomas Griffiths has received one of the two Troland Research Awards issued this year “for his research into how people and machines make decisions.” The Troland awards recognize unusual achievement by young investigators (defined as no older than 40) working within the broad spectrum of experimental psychology.

  • Machine learning could reduce testing, improve treatment for intensive care patients

    Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    Doctors in intensive care units face a continual dilemma: Every blood test they order could yield critical information, but also adds costs and risks for patients. To address this challenge, researchers from Princeton University are developing a computational approach to help clinicians more effectively monitor patients’ conditions and make decisions about the best opportunities to order lab tests for specific patients.

  • Fact-checking immigration: Boustan uses big data to explore myths about the past

    Monday, Jan 7, 2019
    by Kevin McElwee for the Office of the Dean for Research

    “When the horns started to blow and we saw the Statue of Liberty, I thought I was in heaven. Really. She’s up there and saying, ‘Come on in. From now on you are a free person.’”

    These are the words of Turkish immigrant John Alabilikian, who came to the United States in 1922, collected by the Ellis Island Foundation in 1985 as part of its oral history library. In his interview, Alabilikian described escaping the Armenian genocide and journeying to America.

  • From math to meaning: Artificial intelligence blends algorithms and applications

    Wednesday, Jan 2, 2019
    by Kevin McElwee for the Office of the Dean for Research

    Artificial intelligence is already a part of everyday life. It helps us answer questions like “Is this email spam?” It identifies friends in online photographs, selects news stories based on our politics and helps us deposit checks via our phones — if all somewhat imperfectly.

  • Researchers link realism to blockchain's promise

    Wednesday, Dec 26, 2018
    by the Office of Engineering Communications

    Depending on who you ask, blockchain technology is poised to revolutionize the world — from creating a universal currency to building a free and truly private internet. Or, the new technology, built with a combination of encryption and transparency, is a solution in search of a problem.

    The reality likely falls somewhere in between. While a growing number of startups and researchers are devoting themselves to exploring blockchain’s full potential, experts caution that a healthy dose of skepticism is needed to fully evaluate the technology and its eventual place in society.

  • Study scrutinizes hidden marketing relationships on social media

    Friday, Dec 14, 2018
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    Federal regulators require social media personalities to alert their viewers to promotional payments for products and gadgets shown on their channels, but an analysis by Princeton University researchers shows that such disclosures are rare.

  • Sedgewick receives prize for mathematical exposition

    Monday, Nov 26, 2018
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    The American Mathematical Society has awarded its 2019 Leroy P. Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition to Robert Sedgewick, Princeton’s William O. Baker *39 Professor in Computer Science, and posthumously to French computer scientist Philippe Flajolet, for their 2009 book “Analytic Combinatorics.”

  • Houston's urban sprawl increased rainfall, flooding during Hurricane Harvey

    Thursday, Nov 15, 2018
    by Lynn Anderson Davy, University of Iowa, and Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute

    Houston's urban landscape directly contributed to the torrential rainfall and deadly flooding experienced during Hurricane Harvey in August 2017, according to Princeton and University of Iowa researchers. The researchers report in the journal Nature Nov. 15 that Houston's risk for extreme flooding during the hurricane — a category 4 storm that caused an estimated $125 billion in damage and killed 68 people — was 21 times greater due to urbanization. 

  • Smaller components could mean big savings for data centers

    Tuesday, Nov 13, 2018
    by Scott Lyon, Office of Engineering Communications; Molly Seltzer, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

    Researchers at Princeton and MIT have found a way to save big on power consumption for data centers while making a key electronic component much smaller.

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