Energy

  • New platform speeds up effort to turn crops into fuel

    Monday, Aug 30, 2021
    by Scott Lyon, School of Engineering and Applied Science

    Princeton researchers have developed a new way to make fuel from cellulose—Earth's most abundant organic compound, found in all plant cells—speeding up a notoriously slow chemical process and in some cases doubling energy yields over comparable methods.

    Their platform uses a recently developed cellulose emulsion that makes it easier to metabolize the compound into other chemicals. Combining that emulsion with engineered microbes and a light-based genetic tool, the team showed that they could more efficiently make biofuels from cellulose.

  • Projects that blaze new trails in research will receive Dean for Research Innovation funding

    Wednesday, Jul 21, 2021
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Nine exploratory projects, from an effort to exploit inter-microbial warfare in the search for new antibiotics to the development of artificial intelligence for the transcription of ancient documents, have been selected to receive support through the Dean for Research Innovation Funds.

  • Swiss-cheese design could help scientists harness the power of the sun

    Friday, Jun 11, 2021
    by rprosen

    The big holes in Swiss cheese help make it a tasty treat. Now, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are adding tiny, Swiss-cheese-type holes to components to improve the process of bringing to Earth the fusion energy that powers the sun and stars.

  • New computer model helps bring the sun into the laboratory

    Monday, May 10, 2021
    by Raphael Rose, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Every day, the sun ejects large amounts of a hot particle soup known as plasma toward Earth where it can disrupt telecommunications satellites and damage electrical grids. Now, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Princeton University’s Department of Astrophysical Sciences have made a discovery that could lead to better predictions of this space weather and help safeguard sensitive infrastructure.

  • Plasma device designed for consumers can quickly disinfect surfaces

    Monday, Apr 12, 2021
    by John Greenwald, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    The COVID-19 pandemic has cast a harsh light on the urgent need for quick and easy techniques to sanitize and disinfect everyday high-touch objects such as doorknobs, pens, pencils, and personal protective gear worn to keep infections from spreading. Now scientists at the U.S.

  • New high-performance computing cluster will greatly enhance PPPL and Princeton University research

    Monday, Mar 8, 2021
    by jgreenwa

    Stellar, a computing cluster that Princeton University is installing in its High-Performance Computing Research Center, will sharply advance research at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to bring to Earth the fusion energy that powers the sun and stars. The computer, which the Laboratory will share with a broad range of University departments, will be available to the entire PPPL scientific community including engineers.

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