Engineering

  • Protecting smart machines from smart attacks

    Monday, Oct 14, 2019
    by Adam Hadhazy for the Office of Engineering Communications

    Machines' ability to learn by processing data gleaned from sensors underlies automated vehicles, medical devices and a host of other emerging technologies. But that learning ability leaves systems vulnerable to hackers in unexpected ways, researchers at Princeton University have found.

  • Princeton announces initiative to propel innovations in quantum science and technology

    Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Princeton University has announced the creation of the Princeton Quantum Initiative to foster research and training across the spectrum from fundamental quantum science to its application in areas such as computing, sensing and communications.

    The new initiative builds on Princeton's world-renowned expertise in quantum science, the area of physics that describes behaviors at the scale of atoms and electrons. Quantum technologies have the potential to revolutionize areas ranging from secure data transmission to biomedical research, to the discovery of new materials.

  • Controlling methane is a fast and critical way to slow global warming, say Princeton experts

    Thursday, Sep 19, 2019
    by Steven Schultz, Office of Engineering Communications

    In independent studies, two Princeton University research teams recently identified surprisingly large sources of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, being leaked into the atmosphere. Pound for pound, methane causes a far greater warming effect in the atmosphere than does carbon dioxide — 86-fold more heating over 20 years, and 35-fold more over the course of a century.

  • Princeton collaborators bring layered approach to coastal resiliency in New York City

    Monday, Sep 16, 2019
    by Steven Schultz, Office of Engineering Communications

    As a microcosm of the challenges facing coastal cities around the world, New York’s Jamaica Bay pretty much has it all.

    Home to about 3 million people, one of the world's busiest airports and sensitive coastal ecosystems, Jamaica Bay is a lagoon bordered by Brooklyn and Queens at the southwestern edge of Long Island. This region is vulnerable to an evolving set of threats, including sea-level rise, increasingly intense storms and shifting rainfall patterns.

  • Solutions to urban heat differ between tropical and drier climes

    Wednesday, Sep 4, 2019
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    In summer heat, cities may swelter more than nearby suburbs and rural areas. And while the size of this urban heat island effect varies widely among the world’s cities, heat island intensity can largely be explained by a city’s population and precipitation level, researchers reported in a paper published Sept. 4 in the journal Nature.

  • '100-year' floods will happen every one to 30 years, according to new coastal flood prediction maps

    Tuesday, Aug 27, 2019
    by Jen A. Miller for the Office of Engineering Communications

    A 100-year flood is supposed to be just that: a flood that occurs once every 100 years, or a flood that has a 1% chance of happening every year.

    But Princeton researchers have developed new maps that predict coastal flooding for every county on the Eastern and Gulf Coasts and find 100-year floods could become annual occurrences in New England; and happen every one to 30 years along the southeast Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico shorelines.

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