Environment

Double-whammy weather: Study identifies increased frequency of connected patterns from drought to heavy rain in regional hotspots across the globe
May 14, 2020
Author
Written by The Office of Communications

Like an undulating seesaw, weather in some regions swings from drought to heavy rain under the weight of climate-induced changes, according to an analysis published in Geophysical Research Letters. The study finds a link between droughts followed by heavy rain events, along…

Three innovative projects selected to receive funding from the Schmidt Transformative Technology Fund
May 11, 2020
Author
Written by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

Three research endeavors aimed at fundamental challenges in health, information technology and water conservation have been selected for funding through the Eric and Wendy Schmidt Transformative Technology Fund.

The funding will support…

Expansion, environmental impacts of irrigation by 2050 greatly underestimated
May 5, 2020
Author
Written by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute

The amount of farmland around the world that will need to be irrigated in order to feed an estimated global population of 9 billion people by 2050 could be up to several billion acres, far higher than scientists currently project, according to new research. The result would be a far greater strain on aquifers, as well as the likely expansion of…

Human-caused warming will cause more slow-moving hurricanes, warn climatologists
April 22, 2020
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

Hurricanes moving slowly over an area can cause more damage than faster-moving storms, because the longer a storm lingers, the more time it has to pound an area with storm winds and drop huge volumes of rain, leading to flooding. The extraordinary damage caused by storms like Dorian (2019), Florence (2018) and Harvey (2017) prompted Princeton’s…

Princeton scientist solves air quality puzzle: Why is ozone pollution persisting in Europe despite environmental laws banning it?
April 20, 2020
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications
Despite laws limiting pollution from cars, trucks and factories, Europe has found little improvement in ozone air quality in recent years. An international team led by Princeton’s Meiyun Lin found the surprising chain of causes: As global climate change leads to more hot and dry weather, the resulting droughts are stressing plants, making them less able to remove ozone from the air.
Giant umbrellas shift from convenient canopy to sturdy storm shield
April 2, 2020
Author
Written by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

A storm nears the coast, stirring up wind and waves. Along the boardwalk that lines the beach, a row of oversize concrete umbrellas begins to tilt downward, transforming from a convenient canopy to a shield against the coming onslaught.

In a new approach to storm surge protection, a Princeton…

Food systems are fodder for curbing cities’ environmental impacts
March 24, 2020
Author
Written by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

Focusing on urbanization as a key driver of environmental change in the 21st century, researchers at Princeton have created a framework to understand and compare cities’ food systems and their effects on climate change, water use and land use. The research will allow planners to estimate the impact of a city’s food system…

Sea level rise is speeding up, says Princeton climatologist Michael Oppenheimer
Jan. 13, 2020
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

On Sunday, Jan. 12, Princeton University’s Michael Oppenheimer appeared on CBS’s "60 Minutes," speaking about Venice with John…

Climate change could make RSV respiratory infection outbreaks less severe, more common
Dec. 16, 2019
Author
Written by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute

One of the first studies to examine the effect of climate change on diseases such as influenza that are transmitted directly from person to person has found that higher temperatures and increased rainfall could make outbreaks less severe but more common, particularly in North America.

Princeton University-led researchers studied how…

New modeling will shed light on ways policy decisions affect human migration from sea level rise
Nov. 26, 2019
Author
Written by The Office of Communications

A new modeling approach can help researchers, policymakers and the public better understand how policy decisions will influence human migration as sea levels rise around the globe, a paper published Nov. 26 in Nature Climate Change