Environment

  • Did volcanoes kill the dinosaurs? New evidence points to ‘maybe’

    Monday, Mar 4, 2019
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    Fact: About 66 million years ago, at the end of the Cretaceous period, 75 percent of plant and animal species went extinct, including the dinosaurs (except those that evolved into birds). Fact: About 66 million years ago, an enormous asteroid or comet hit the Earth near what is now Chicxulub, Mexico, throwing rock, dust and water vapor into the atmosphere.

  • Put eggs all in one basket, or spread them around? Birds know best

    Wednesday, Feb 27, 2019
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    In the tropical jungle of Central America where predators abound, a species of cuckoo has found safety in numbers by building communal nests guarded by two or three breeding pairs.

    Why then do these agreeable avians sometimes ditch the collaborative lifestyle and instead deposit eggs into nests outside the communal group, acting like social parasites, in the hopes that other females will raise the chicks as their own?

  • North Carolinian boats are now fishing off New Jersey’s coast

    Monday, Feb 18, 2019
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    As the oceans warm in response to climate change, fishing boats in the Mid-Atlantic that focus on only one or two species of fish are traveling more than 250 miles farther north than they did 20 years ago, while others catching a wide diversity of species have not changed fishing location, reported Talia Young, a postdoctoral research associate in ecology and evolutionary biology at Princeton.

  • MERMAIDs reveal secrets from below the ocean floor

    Monday, Feb 4, 2019
    by Princeton University

    Seismologists use waves generated by earthquakes to scan the interior of our planet, much like doctors image their patients using medical tomography. Earth imaging has helped us track down the deep origins of volcanic islands such as Hawaii, and identify the source zones of deep earthquakes.

  • Sewers could help clean the atmosphere

    Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
    by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications

    Sewage treatment — an unglamorous backbone of urban living — could offer a cost-effective way to combat climate change by flushing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

  • Andlinger Center Speaks: U.S. carbon dioxide emissions rise by 3.4 percent

    Monday, Jan 14, 2019
    by Molly Seltzer, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

    Carbon dioxide emissions rose in the U.S. by 3.4 percent in 2018, according to preliminary estimates released this week. Increased electricity demand and economic growth are among the contributing factors the report cites. Interestingly, electricity production from coal actually dropped last year.

    Experts Judi Greenwald, Eric Larson and Michael Oppenheimer from Princeton University’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment comment on the news.

  • Researchers track hurricane’s effects on river pollution and beneficial bacteria

    Monday, Jan 7, 2019
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    On a rainy Saturday in October, Princeton graduate students Arianna Sherman and Weitao Shuai parked their car by a bridge on a rural road in Hillsborough, North Carolina. In rubber boots, they waded into a muddy stream to begin investigating how farm waste and a giant storm may have disrupted an ecosystem.

  • Treasure in ancient trash: Learning about Japan's history through metals waste

    Friday, Dec 28, 2018
    by Kevin McElwee for the Office of the Dean for Research

    Thomas Conlan fiddled with a strange, brownish-black rock on his desk. For centuries, people had considered the piece of rubble worthless, but it is priceless to Conlan’s research.

    The lumpy rock is a sample of slag, the material left over after heating ore to extract valuable metals. With researchers from art, engineering and materials science, Conlan is exploring whether these discarded scraps can fill gaps in early Japanese history.

Pages

Subscribe to Environment