Environment

  • Government subsidies could be key to containing hospital-born infections

    Wednesday, Apr 3, 2019
    by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute

    Health care-associated infections — illnesses that people contract while being treated in a hospital or other health care facility — sicken millions of people each year and cost billions of dollars in additional treatment. While there has been some improvement over the years, on any given day, about 3 percent of the hospitalized population in the United States has at least one health care-associated infection, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

  • Funds spur innovation and benefit for society

    Wednesday, Mar 6, 2019
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    Funds spur innovation and benefit for society Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications Mar 6, 2019 faculty A new method to combat antibiotic resistance; a way to use computer science to limit misinformation; and a plan to better understand the impacts of land use and climate change on flooding are among 19 projects awarded Innovation Research Grants this year through the School of Engineering and Applied Science.

     

  • ‘She Roars’ podcast explores urgency of climate change with Lynn Loo, director of Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

    Friday, Mar 8, 2019
    by Margaret Koval, Office of Communications

    Engineering professor Lynn Loo, director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, says the dangers of climate change are so pressing that it’s time for all hands on deck to decarbonize the U.S. and global economies. She praises the issue awareness behind legislation introduced in Congress to implement a “Green New Deal,” but stresses that solar and wind technologies, by themselves, are not yet sufficient to fuel the nation. “We’re always racing against time,” explains Loo.

  • Did volcanoes kill the dinosaurs? New evidence points to ‘maybe’

    Monday, Mar 4, 2019
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    Fact: About 66 million years ago, at the end of the Cretaceous period, 75 percent of plant and animal species went extinct, including the dinosaurs (except those that evolved into birds). Fact: About 66 million years ago, an enormous asteroid or comet hit the Earth near what is now Chicxulub, Mexico, throwing rock, dust and water vapor into the atmosphere.

  • Put eggs all in one basket, or spread them around? Birds know best

    Wednesday, Feb 27, 2019
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    In the tropical jungle of Central America where predators abound, a species of cuckoo has found safety in numbers by building communal nests guarded by two or three breeding pairs.

    Why then do these agreeable avians sometimes ditch the collaborative lifestyle and instead deposit eggs into nests outside the communal group, acting like social parasites, in the hopes that other females will raise the chicks as their own?

  • North Carolinian boats are now fishing off New Jersey’s coast

    Monday, Feb 18, 2019
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    As the oceans warm in response to climate change, fishing boats in the Mid-Atlantic that focus on only one or two species of fish are traveling more than 250 miles farther north than they did 20 years ago, while others catching a wide diversity of species have not changed fishing location, reported Talia Young, a postdoctoral research associate in ecology and evolutionary biology at Princeton.

  • MERMAIDs reveal secrets from below the ocean floor

    Monday, Feb 4, 2019
    by Princeton University

    Seismologists use waves generated by earthquakes to scan the interior of our planet, much like doctors image their patients using medical tomography. Earth imaging has helped us track down the deep origins of volcanic islands such as Hawaii, and identify the source zones of deep earthquakes.

  • Sewers could help clean the atmosphere

    Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
    by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications

    Sewage treatment — an unglamorous backbone of urban living — could offer a cost-effective way to combat climate change by flushing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

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