Life Sciences

Princeton I-Corps team tackles breast milk shelf-life problem
May 7, 2024
Author
Written by Alaina O'Regan, Office of the Dean for Research

Soon after the birth of her second child, Katie Silpe started freezing her breast milk for the period ahead when she would return to work. When she thawed the milk later, however, her baby refused to drink it. Detecting a noticeable change in both taste and smell, Katie realized her stored milk was unusable. 

Princeton’s Koval and Simpkins Awarded NJ ACTS Translational Science Fellowships
Nov. 1, 2023
Author
Written by by Caitlin Sedwick for the Department of Molecular Biology

2023 marks the fifth year of the NIH-funded New Jersey Alliance for Clinical and Translational Science (NJ ACTS) TL1 fellowship program. Two…

Singling out a bacterium from the crowd
Sept. 13, 2023
Author
Written by by Caitlin Sedwick for the Department of Molecular Biology

Three Princeton laboratories teamed up to develop a method for studying gene expression patterns of individual bacteria in unprecedented detail.

How eavesdropping viruses battle it out to infect us
July 26, 2023
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

Viruses, like movie villains, operate in one of two ways: chill or kill.

They can lie low, quietly infiltrating the body’s defenses, or go on the attack, making many copies of themselves that explode out of hiding and fire in all directions. Viral attacks are almost always suicide missions, ripping apart the cell that the virus has been…

A tiny marsupial is upending ideas about the origins of flying mammals
April 17, 2023
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

Flying squirrels, sugar gliders and bats haven’t had a common ancestor in 160 million years, but they form their wing flaps using some of the same genetic ingredients.

That’s the intriguing finding from a Princeton-led team of biologists, detailed recently in the journal Science Advances. In other words, when the seven known flying…

Rabinowitz: Cancerous tumors are sluggardly … and thrifty
Feb. 2, 2023
Author
Written by Wendy Plump, Department of Chemistry

Scientists have never known precisely how much energy a cancerous tumor expends growing in the mammalian body.

They hypothesized that it consumes a great deal of energy, churning through nutrients and putting healthy tissue – the heart, the liver, the pancreas – at a disadvantage as the metabolic system spreads the nutritive…

Kristina Olson's keen scholarship is informing the conversation on gender identity
Dec. 2, 2022
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

When a friend asked Kristina Olson how to support their young child — who heard “It’s a boy!” at birth but who was now saying “I’m a girl” — Olson thought, “I’m a developmental psychologist. I’ll read the literature, and then I can tell her what it says.”

But she quickly discovered that there were no papers in the peer-reviewed…

Bumblebees kept in isolation make up for it by being more social later
July 6, 2022
Author
Written by Alaina O'Regan, Office of the Dean for Research

A new study shows that social isolation changes the behavior and brain development of bumblebees, but not in the way researchers expected.

The study explored how bumblebees, which depend largely on their social instincts for survival, were impacted by being socially isolated during a key developmental period.

The researchers…

'Fantastic giant tortoise,' believed extinct, confirmed alive in the Galápagos
June 9, 2022
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

A tortoise from a Galápagos species long believed extinct has been found alive and now confirmed to be a living member of the species. The tortoise, named Fernanda after her Fernandina Island home, is the first of her species identified in more than a century.

The Fernandina Island Galápagos giant tortoise (Chelonoidis phantasticus…

How fast-growing algae could enhance growth of food crops
May 19, 2022
Author
Written by Caitlin Sedwick for the Department of Molecular Biology

Researchers used computer modeling to identify the features that green algae use to enhance carbon usage, providing a blueprint for engineering this approach into crop plants.