Life Sciences

  • Researchers find a way to peel slimy biofilms like old stickers

    Wednesday, Dec 5, 2018
    by Adam Hadhazy for the Office of Engineering Communications

    Slimy, hard-to-clean bacterial mats called biofilms cause problems ranging from medical infections to clogged drains and fouled industrial equipment. Now, researchers at Princeton have found a way to cleanly and completely peel off these notorious sludges.

  • New tools illuminate mechanisms behind overlooked cellular components’ critical roles

    Friday, Nov 30, 2018
    by Adam Hadhazy for the Office of Engineering Communications

    Creating new tools that harness light to probe the mysteries of cellular behavior, Princeton researchers have made discoveries about the formation of cellular components called membraneless organelles and the key role these organelles play in cells.

    In two papers published Nov. 29 in the journal Cell, researchers from multiple Princeton departments report on the conditions that lead to the formation of membraneless organelles and the impact that the formation has on cellular DNA.

  • Burdine and Weber named AAAS Fellows

    Tuesday, Nov 27, 2018
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    Princeton University faculty members Rebecca Burdine and Elke Weber have been named 2018 fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for their scientifically or socially distinguished work.

    New fellows will be honored Feb. 16 during the 2019 AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., and in the AAAS News & Notes section of the Nov. 29 issue of Science.

  • Princeton geneticist solves long-standing finch beak mystery

    Monday, Nov 19, 2018
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    Bridgett vonHoldt is best known for her work with dogs and wolves, so she was surprised when a bird biologist pulled her aside and said, “I really think you can help me solve this problem.” So she turned to a mystery he’d been wrestling with for more than 20 years.

  • Bee social or buzz off: Study links genes to social behaviors, including autism

    Thursday, Oct 18, 2018
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Those pesky bees that come buzzing around on a muggy summer day are helping researchers reveal the genes responsible for social behaviors. A new study published this week found that the social lives of sweat bees — named for their attraction to perspiration — are linked to patterns of activity in specific genes, including ones linked to autism.

  • Ant-y social: Successful ant colonies hint at how societies evolve

    Thursday, Aug 23, 2018
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    Ants and humans live in large societies that allow for elaborate structures — nests, cities — filled with resources. Sometime in the distant past, individuals must have organized themselves into the first simple groups, precursors of these complex societies. But how?

    A team of researchers from Princeton University and Rockefeller University tackled this question by combining sophisticated mathematical models with detailed empirical observations of the clonal raider ant (Ooceraea biroi).

  • From 'sea of mutations,' two possible cancer links rise to the surface

    Wednesday, Aug 8, 2018
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    By analyzing data from thousands of patients, Princeton researchers have identified genetic mutations that frequently occur in people with uterine cancer, colorectal cancer or skin cancer — an important step toward using genome sequences to better understand cancer and guide new treatments.

  • Data tools give microscopes unprecedented views of living and physical systems

    Wednesday, Aug 8, 2018
    by Steven Schultz, Office of Engineering Communications

    Techniques and tools for seeing fleeting arrangements of atoms during chemical reactions are advancing rapidly, allowing unprecedented insights into physical and living systems, according to experts in microscopy from around the world who gathered for a three-day conference at Princeton in July.

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