Life Sciences

Bassler receives Schering Prize for discovering bacterial communication
Sept. 4, 2018
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

Schering Stiftung announced Monday, Sept. 3, that they were awarding the 2018 Ernst Schering Prize to molecular biologist Bonnie Bassler for her pioneering…

Ant-y social: Successful ant colonies hint at how societies evolve
Aug. 23, 2018
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

Ants and humans live in large societies that allow for elaborate structures — nests, cities — filled with resources. Sometime in the distant past, individuals must have organized themselves into the first simple groups, precursors of these complex societies. But how?

A team of researchers from Princeton University and Rockefeller…

From 'sea of mutations,' two possible cancer links rise to the surface
Aug. 8, 2018
Author
Written by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

By analyzing data from thousands of patients, Princeton researchers have identified genetic mutations that frequently occur in people with uterine cancer, colorectal cancer or skin cancer — an important step toward using genome sequences to better understand cancer and guide new treatments.

Data tools give microscopes unprecedented views of living and physical systems
Aug. 8, 2018
Author
Written by Steven Schultz, Office of Engineering Communications

Techniques and tools for seeing fleeting arrangements of atoms during chemical reactions are advancing rapidly, allowing unprecedented insights into physical and living systems, according to experts in microscopy from around the world who gathered for a three-day conference at Princeton in July.

Organized by the

Modern Flores Island pygmies show no genetic link to extinct 'hobbits'
Aug. 2, 2018
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

Two pygmy populations on the same tropical island. One went extinct tens of thousands of years ago; the other still lives there. Are they related?

It’s a simple question that took years to answer.

As no one has been able to recover DNA from the fossils of Homo floresiensis (nicknamed the “hobbit”), researchers had…

Princeton researchers discover the ‘optimism’ of E. coli bacteria
July 23, 2018
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

A team of researchers from across the Princeton University campus collaborated to determine how E. coli bacteria respond when they are deprived of three key nutrients: carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus.

They were surprised to find that the bacteria had different strategies for dealing with each of the nutrient restrictions…

Imaging in living cells reveals how ‘junk DNA’ switches on a gene
July 23, 2018
Author
Written by Kevin McElwee for the Office of the Dean for Research

Researchers have captured video showing how pieces of DNA once thought to be useless can act as on-off switches for genes.

These pieces of DNA are part of over 90 percent of the genetic material that are not genes. Researchers now know that this "junk DNA" contains most of the information that can turn on or off genes. But how these…

Brangwynne selected as Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator
May 23, 2018
Author
Written by Adam Hadhazy for the Office of Engineering Communications

Brangwynne, an associate professor of chemical and biological engineering at Princeton University, is one of 19 new investigators named by the institute on May 23. The distinction is one of the most sought-after awards in biomedical research.

“I’m incredibly honored,” said Brangwynne, the…

Researchers use light to turn yeast into biochemical factories
March 22, 2018
Author
Written by Lonnie Shekhtman for the Office of Engineering Communications

Scientists have recently learned how to use light to control specific groups of neurons to better understand the operation of the brain, a development that has transformed areas of neuroscience. Researchers at Princeton University have now applied a similar method to controlling the metabolism, or basic chemical process, of a living cell. In a…

A new weapon against bone metastasis? Princeton lab develops antibody to fight cancer
Dec. 19, 2017
In the ongoing battle between cancer and modern medicine, some therapeutic agents, while effective, can bring undesirable or even dangerous side effects. “Chemo saves lives and improves survival, but it could work much better if you eliminate unwanted side effects from it,” said Princeton University cancer researcher Yibin Kang, the Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professor of Molecular Biology.