Physical Sciences

  • Princeton's James Peebles receives Nobel Prize in Physics

    Tuesday, Oct 8, 2019
    by The Office of Communications

    Princeton University professor emeritus and 1962 graduate alumnus James Peebles has been awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics "for theoretical discoveries in physical cosmology."

    "This year's prize goes to contributions to our understanding of the evolution of our universe and Earth's place in the cosmos," Göran K. Hansson, secretary general of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said today. 

  • Versatile physics leader Stefan Gerhardt elected an APS fellow

    Thursday, Oct 3, 2019
    by jgreenwa

    Stefan Gerhardt, who heads research operations and serves as deputy director of the recovery project for the flagship fusion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), has been elected a 2019 American Physical Society (APS) Fellow. The APS annually recognizes as fellows no more than one-half of one percent of its more than 55,000 worldwide members.

  • Princeton announces initiative to propel innovations in quantum science and technology

    Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Princeton University has announced the creation of the Princeton Quantum Initiative to foster research and training across the spectrum from fundamental quantum science to its application in areas such as computing, sensing and communications.

    The new initiative builds on Princeton's world-renowned expertise in quantum science, the area of physics that describes behaviors at the scale of atoms and electrons. Quantum technologies have the potential to revolutionize areas ranging from secure data transmission to biomedical research, to the discovery of new materials.

  • New topological behavior of electrons in 3-D magnetic material

    Friday, Sep 20, 2019
    An international team of researchers led by scientists at Princeton University has found that a magnetic material at room temperature enables electrons to behave counterintuitively, acting collectively rather than as individuals. Their collective behavior mimics massless particles and anti-particles that coexist in an unexpected way and together form an exotic loop-like structure. The study was published this week in the journal Science.
  • Princeton collaborators bring layered approach to coastal resiliency in New York City

    Monday, Sep 16, 2019
    by Steven Schultz, Office of Engineering Communications

    As a microcosm of the challenges facing coastal cities around the world, New York’s Jamaica Bay pretty much has it all.

    Home to about 3 million people, one of the world's busiest airports and sensitive coastal ecosystems, Jamaica Bay is a lagoon bordered by Brooklyn and Queens at the southwestern edge of Long Island. This region is vulnerable to an evolving set of threats, including sea-level rise, increasingly intense storms and shifting rainfall patterns.

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