Physical Sciences

Princeton alumnus Dennis Sullivan wins Abel Prize for mathematics
March 28, 2022
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters has awarded the 2022 Abel Prize to Dennis Sullivan, a 1966 Ph.D. graduate of Princeton, “for his groundbreaking contributions to topology in its broadest sense, and in particular its algebraic, geometric and dynamical…

New Princeton spinout will bring 'poisoned arrow' antibiotic and other new medicines to the market
March 22, 2022
Author
Written by Wright Señeres, Princeton Entrepreneurship Council; Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

Two years ago, molecular biologist Zemer Gitai and his research group announced that they had discovered an antibiotic that simultaneously pierced through a disease's defenses while poisoning it from within, like a poison-tipped arrow. And better yet, it was not susceptible to antibiotic resistance.

Discovering the “poisoned arrow"…

Scientists visualize electron crystals in a quantum superposition
Feb. 23, 2022
Author
Written by Tom Garlinghouse for the Department of Physics

Princeton scientists are using innovative techniques to visualize electrons in graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon atoms. They are finding that strong interactions between electrons in high magnetic fields drive them to form unusual crystal-like structures similar to those first recognized for benzene molecules in the 1860s by chemist…

These plants have 'underground weapons' in ecological competition. Read about the Princeton research.
Feb. 14, 2022
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

Most of us only think about the easily visible parts of plants — stems, flowers, leaves — but in a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Princeton ecologists Lars Hedin and

Astrophysicists find a way to form dark matter-deficient galaxies
Feb. 14, 2022
Author
Written by By Liz Fuller-Wright, Princeton University, and Lucas Van Wyk Joel, University of California-Irvine

In a new Nature Astronomy study, an international team of astrophysicists report how, when tiny galaxies collide with bigger ones, the bigger galaxies can strip the smaller galaxies of their dark matter — matter that we can’t see directly, but which astrophysicists think must exist because, without its gravitational effects, they couldn’t…

What is your dog’s lifespan? A Princeton geneticist is seeking the keys to canine health and longevity.
Feb. 2, 2022
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

How old is your dog in human years? And what factors contribute to a long and healthy life for a dog?

For years, it’s been generally accepted that “dog years” are roughly human years times seven – that a 1-year-old puppy is like a 7-year-old child, and an 11-year-old elderly dog is like a 77-year-old senior citizen. But it’s actually…

Glowing yeast lights the way to better biofuels
Jan. 28, 2022
Author
Written by Tom Garlinghouse for the School of Engineering

Deploying a technique that promises to supercharge the development of biofuels, researchers at Princeton University have found a way to make yeast cultures glow when producing next generation fuels that could power cars and airplanes.

The glowing cultures address a major challenge that has slowed biofuel production: developing yeast…

The next big thing from Princeton's MacMillan lab: an ‘improbable’ mechanism for a difficult chemical bond
Jan. 18, 2022
Author
Written by Wendy Plump, Department of Chemistry

The challenge to build a better molecule is a constant for researchers working with Princeton’s David MacMillan, who in October won the Nobel Prize in chemistry. The latest work from the team, published in Science on the heels of

Oral and gut microbes can inactivate an antidiabetic drug, Princeton scientists find
Dec. 21, 2021
Author
Written by Caitlin Sedwick for the Department of Molecular Biology
In a paper published online and in the December 2, 2021 issue of the journal Nature, researchers from Princeton University describe their discovery that microbes living in the human digestive tract can inactivate the antidiabetic drug acarbose, which may affect the drug’s impact on the microbiome as well as its efficacy in patients.
Kleiner develops method to profile RNA-modifying enzymes
Oct. 4, 2021
Author
Written by Wendy Plump, Department of Chemistry

Using a largescale approach to studying cellular proteins called chemoproteomics, Ralph Kleiner, assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry, has developed a methodology that provides insights into a cell’s RNA modifications and their associated enzymes, expanding our knowledge of the workings of this central biomolecule…