Technology

Unmasking the magic of superconductivity in twisted graphene
Oct. 20, 2021
Author
Written by Tom Garlinghouse for the Department of Physics

The discovery in 2018 of superconductivity in two single-atom-thick layers of graphene stacked at a precise angle of 1.1 degrees (called ‘magic’-angle twisted bilayer graphene) came as a big surprise to the scientific community. Since the discovery, physicists have asked whether magic graphene’s superconductivity can…

Faculty to lead development of quantum simulators in major NSF-funded effort
Sept. 2, 2021
Author
Written by Scott Lyon, School of Engineering and Applied Science

Seeking a detailed blueprint for early quantum computing applications, Princeton researchers have joined a multi-institutional effort to develop large-scale simulators to study complex quantum systems.

The National Science Foundation’s Quantum Leap Challenge Institute for Robust Quantum Simulation, announced on September 2, brings…

Princeton-led team discovers unexpected quantum behavior in kagome lattice
June 18, 2021
Author
Written by Department of Physics

An international team led by researchers at Princeton University has uncovered a new pattern of ordering of electric charge in a novel superconducting material.

The researchers discovered the new type of ordering in a material containing atoms arranged in a peculiar structure known as a kagome lattice. While researchers already…

Engineering and artificial intelligence combine to safeguard COVID-19 patients
Jan. 26, 2021
Author
Written by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications

Spurred by the demands of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers at Princeton and Google are applying mechanical engineering and artificial intelligence to increase the availability and effectiveness of ventilation treatments worldwide.

Ventilators and their support equipment are expensive and complex devices that require expert attention…

Super surfaces use terahertz waves to help bounce wireless communication into the next generation
Dec. 14, 2020
Author
Written by Adam Hadhazy, School of Engineering

Assembling tiny chips into unique programmable surfaces, Princeton researchers have created a key component toward unlocking a communications band that promises to dramatically increase the amount of data wireless systems can transmit.

The programmable surface, called a metasurface, allows engineers to control and focus transmissions…

Quantum chemist Leslie Schoop wins 2020 Packard Fellowship
Oct. 15, 2020
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation announced today that quantum chemist Leslie Schoop is one of 20 researchers to receive a Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering, targeted to…

Center for materials of the future awarded $18M six-year funding
July 28, 2020
Author
Written by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

The Princeton Center for Complex Materials, a research center at Princeton University dedicated to discovering the materials of the future and training a globally competitive and diverse workforce, has been selected by the

Benjamin’s 'Race After Technology' speaks to a growing concern among many of tech bias
May 15, 2020
Author
Written by Denise Valenti, Office of Communications

In her latest book, “Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code,” Ruha Benjamin offers a detailed, critical and sobering view of the ways in which bias is infused into technology.

Since the book’s release in June 2019 by Polity Press, Benjamin, an…

Three innovative projects selected to receive funding from the Schmidt Transformative Technology Fund
May 11, 2020
Author
Written by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

Three research endeavors aimed at fundamental challenges in health, information technology and water conservation have been selected for funding through the Eric and Wendy Schmidt Transformative Technology Fund.

The funding will support…

New Princeton study takes superconductivity to the edge
April 30, 2020
Princeton researchers detect a supercurrent — a current flowing without energy loss — at the edge of a superconductor with a topological twist.