Technology

  • Sewers could help clean the atmosphere

    Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
    by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications

    Sewage treatment — an unglamorous backbone of urban living — could offer a cost-effective way to combat climate change by flushing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

  • Machine learning could reduce testing, improve treatment for intensive care patients

    Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    Doctors in intensive care units face a continual dilemma: Every blood test they order could yield critical information, but also adds costs and risks for patients. To address this challenge, researchers from Princeton University are developing a computational approach to help clinicians more effectively monitor patients’ conditions and make decisions about the best opportunities to order lab tests for specific patients.

  • Treasure in ancient trash: Learning about Japan's history through metals waste

    Friday, Dec 28, 2018
    by Kevin McElwee for the Office of the Dean for Research

    Thomas Conlan fiddled with a strange, brownish-black rock on his desk. For centuries, people had considered the piece of rubble worthless, but it is priceless to Conlan’s research.

    The lumpy rock is a sample of slag, the material left over after heating ore to extract valuable metals. With researchers from art, engineering and materials science, Conlan is exploring whether these discarded scraps can fill gaps in early Japanese history.

  • Study scrutinizes hidden marketing relationships on social media

    Friday, Dec 14, 2018
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    Federal regulators require social media personalities to alert their viewers to promotional payments for products and gadgets shown on their channels, but an analysis by Princeton University researchers shows that such disclosures are rare.

  • Studying how unconventional metals behave, with an eye toward high-temperature superconductors

    Wednesday, Dec 12, 2018
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Using laser light to trap atoms in a checkerboard-like pattern, a team led by Princeton scientists studied how resistance — the loss of electrical current as heat — can develop in unconventional metals.

    The results may help explain how certain types of superconductors made from copper oxides are able to conduct electricity so efficiently. The research was published online Dec. 6 in the journal Science.

  • Researchers find a way to peel slimy biofilms like old stickers

    Wednesday, Dec 5, 2018
    by Adam Hadhazy for the Office of Engineering Communications

    Slimy, hard-to-clean bacterial mats called biofilms cause problems ranging from medical infections to clogged drains and fouled industrial equipment. Now, researchers at Princeton have found a way to cleanly and completely peel off these notorious sludges.

  • Merging memory and computation, programmable chip speeds AI, slashes power use

    Wednesday, Nov 14, 2018
    by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications

    By shifting a fundamental property of computation, Princeton researchers have built a new type of computer chip that boosts the performance and slashes the energy demands of systems used for artificial intelligence.

    The chip, which works with standard programming languages, could be particularly useful on phones, watches or other devices that rely on high-performance computing and have limited battery life.

  • Smaller components could mean big savings for data centers

    Tuesday, Nov 13, 2018
    by Scott Lyon, Office of Engineering Communications; Molly Seltzer, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

    Researchers at Princeton and MIT have found a way to save big on power consumption for data centers while making a key electronic component much smaller.

  • New animation tool streamlines the creation of moving pictures

    Friday, Oct 26, 2018
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    It’s often easy to imagine balloons soaring or butterflies fluttering across a still image, but realizing this vision through computer animation is easier said than done. Now, a team of researchers has developed a new tool that makes animating such images much simpler.

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