Technology

  • Forensic engineering preserves art treasures by saving historic buildings

    Tuesday, May 21, 2019
    by Amelia Herb, Office of Engineering Communications

    Italian Renaissance frescos of the gods and goddesses of air, water, fire and earth enliven the ceiling and four walls of the Room of the Elements in Florence’s famed Palazzo Vecchio, but without structural engineers’ work to preserve such historic buildings, the world could eventually lose these masterpieces.

  • Coping with growth: Conference presents ideas to shape future cities

    Thursday, May 9, 2019
    by John Sullivan and Amelia Herb, Office of Engineering Communications

    Any attempt to address challenges of the future, from clean energy to a sufficient food supply, must grapple with the issues raised by the planet’s rapidly growing cities, speakers said Monday during a conference at Princeton University.

  • Symposium marks growth for Princeton’s materials institute

    Friday, Apr 5, 2019
    by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications

    Materials science is an "enabling discipline,” Dean of Engineering and Applied Science Emily A. Carter told the audience gathered for the annual symposium of Princeton’s materials institute last week. It allows researchers, students and entrepreneurs from widely different fields to come together to create new technologies and solutions to difficult societal problems.

  • Princeton Profiles: Roberts sisters study how to make the internet fairer and safer

    Thursday, Mar 21, 2019
    by Melissa Moss, Office of Communications

    When they were growing up in Dallas, Claudia and Laura Roberts would get frequent talks from their parents about how they might be judged by different standards in society due to prejudice.

    “Our father is from Panama and our mother is from Mexico,” said Claudia. “As immigrants to this country, they thought a lot about how to raise two girls in America and give us the best chance at a successful path.”

  • Princeton students tell a gripping story for NASA

    Friday, Mar 8, 2019
    by Jen Miller for the Office of Engineering Communications

    When picturing a robot designed to do a human task, such as moving a delicate instrument, it’s logical to see it as something that looks like a human.

  • Doctoral research helps develop tool to probe plastics’ behavior down to the molecular scale

    Friday, Mar 8, 2019
    by Adam Hadhazy, Office of Engineering Communications

    Consider the humble tire. Sitting outside on a frigid winter day, it's hard as a stone, yet when spinning under a drag racer, a tire becomes warmly pliable. For everyday materials, from glass to rubber to plastic, these fundamental changes in behavior are determined by the glass transition temperature.

  • Good news for future tech: Exotic ‘topological’ materials are surprisingly common

    Wednesday, Feb 27, 2019
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    In a major step forward for an area of research that earned the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics, an international team has found that substances with exotic electronic behaviors called topological materials are in fact quite common, and include everyday elements such as arsenic and gold. The team created an online catalog to make it easy to design new topological materials using elements from the periodic table.

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