Technology

  • Fast and fragile: Two new studies explain the strange electron flow in future materials

    Thursday, Feb 13, 2020
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Electrons race along the surface of certain unusual crystalline materials, except that sometimes they don't. Two new studies from Princeton researchers and their collaborators explain the source of the surprising behavior and chart a course for restoring the speedy flow of electrons through these remarkable crystals, prized for their potential use in future technologies including quantum computers.

  • In leap for quantum computing, silicon quantum bits establish a long-distance relationship

    Monday, Dec 30, 2019
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Imagine a world where people could only talk to their next-door neighbor, and messages must be passed house to house to reach far destinations.

    Until now, this has been the situation for the bits of hardware that make up a silicon quantum computer, a type of quantum computer with the potential to be cheaper and more versatile than today's versions.

  • New rules illuminate how objects absorb and emit light

    Monday, Dec 23, 2019
    by Scott Lyon, Office of Engineering Communications

    Princeton researchers have uncovered new rules governing how objects absorb and emit light, fine-tuning scientists' control over light and boosting research into next-generation solar and optical devices.

    The discovery solves a longstanding problem of scale, where light's behavior when interacting with tiny objects violates well-established physical constraints observed at larger scales.

  • Foam offers way to manipulate light

    Tuesday, Nov 19, 2019
    by Steven Schultz, Office of Engineering Communications

    There is more to foam than meets the eye. Literally. A study by Princeton scientists has shown that a type of foam long studied by researchers is able to block particular wavelengths of light, a coveted property for next-generation information technology that uses light instead of electricity.

  • Schmidt DataX Fund supports research projects that harness data science to speed up discovery

    Monday, Nov 18, 2019
    by Sharon Adarlo, Center for Statistics and Machine Learning

    Nine data-driven research projects have won funding from Princeton University’s Schmidt DataX Fund, which aims to spread and deepen the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning across campus to accelerate discovery.

    In February, the University announced the new fund, which was made possible through a major gift from Schmidt Futures.

  • Princeton announces initiative to propel innovations in quantum science and technology

    Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Princeton University has announced the creation of the Princeton Quantum Initiative to foster research and training across the spectrum from fundamental quantum science to its application in areas such as computing, sensing and communications.

    The new initiative builds on Princeton's world-renowned expertise in quantum science, the area of physics that describes behaviors at the scale of atoms and electrons. Quantum technologies have the potential to revolutionize areas ranging from secure data transmission to biomedical research, to the discovery of new materials.

  • New topological behavior of electrons in 3-D magnetic material

    Friday, Sep 20, 2019
    An international team of researchers led by scientists at Princeton University has found that a magnetic material at room temperature enables electrons to behave counterintuitively, acting collectively rather than as individuals. Their collective behavior mimics massless particles and anti-particles that coexist in an unexpected way and together form an exotic loop-like structure. The study was published this week in the journal Science.
  • New national facility will explore low-temperature plasma — a dynamic source of innovation for modern technologies

    Thursday, Sep 5, 2019
    by John Greenwald, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Low-temperature plasma, a rapidly expanding source of innovation in fields ranging from electronics to health care to space exploration, is a highly complex state of matter. So complex that the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has teamed with Princeton University to become home to a collaborative facility open to researchers from across the country to advance the understanding and control of this dynamic physical state.

  • Strange warping geometry helps to push scientific boundaries

    Monday, Jul 15, 2019
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    Atomic interactions in everyday solids and liquids are so complex that some of these materials’ properties continue to elude physicists’ understanding. Solving the problems mathematically is beyond the capabilities of modern computers, so scientists at Princeton University have turned to an unusual branch of geometry instead.

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