Technology

Princeton Profiles: Roberts sisters study how to make the internet fairer and safer
March 21, 2019
Author
Written by Melissa Moss, Office of Communications

When they were growing up in Dallas, Claudia and Laura Roberts would get frequent talks from their parents about how they might be judged by different standards in society due to prejudice.

“Our father is from Panama and our mother is from Mexico,” said Claudia. “As immigrants to this country, they thought a lot about how to raise two…

Princeton students tell a gripping story for NASA
March 8, 2019
Author
Written by Jen Miller for the Office of Engineering Communications

When picturing a robot designed to do a human task, such as moving a delicate instrument, it’s logical to see it as something that looks like a human.

But when the Princeton Rocketry Club took on NASA’s annual…

Doctoral research helps develop tool to probe plastics’ behavior down to the molecular scale
March 8, 2019
Author
Written by Adam Hadhazy, Office of Engineering Communications

Consider the humble tire. Sitting outside on a frigid winter day, it's hard as a stone, yet when spinning under a drag racer, a tire becomes warmly pliable. For everyday materials, from glass to rubber to plastic, these fundamental changes in behavior are determined by the glass transition temperature.

For engineers trying to come up…

Good news for future tech: Exotic ‘topological’ materials are surprisingly common
Feb. 27, 2019
Author
Written by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

In a major step forward for an area of research that earned the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics, an international team has found that substances with exotic electronic behaviors called topological materials are in fact quite common, and include everyday elements such as arsenic and gold. The team created an

Sewers could help clean the atmosphere
Jan. 15, 2019
Author
Written by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications

Sewage treatment — an unglamorous backbone of urban living — could offer a cost-effective way to combat climate change by flushing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

In an article analyzing several possible technical approaches in the journal Nature Sustainability on Dec…

Machine learning could reduce testing, improve treatment for intensive care patients
Jan. 15, 2019
Author
Written by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

Doctors in intensive care units face a continual dilemma: Every blood test they order could yield critical information, but also adds costs and risks for patients. To address this challenge, researchers from Princeton University are developing a computational approach to help clinicians more effectively monitor patients’…

Treasure in ancient trash: Learning about Japan's history through metals waste
Dec. 28, 2018
Author
Written by Kevin McElwee for the Office of the Dean for Research

Thomas Conlan fiddled with a strange, brownish-black rock on his desk. For centuries, people had considered the piece of rubble worthless, but it is priceless to Conlan’s research.

The lumpy rock is a sample of slag, the material left over…

Translating the ‘language of behavior’ with artificially intelligent motion capture
Dec. 20, 2018
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

You might have seen Hollywood stars in "motion capture" suits, acting in full-body costumes peppered with sensors that let a computer transform them into a Hulk or a dragon or an

Study scrutinizes hidden marketing relationships on social media
Dec. 14, 2018
Author
Written by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

Federal regulators require social media personalities to alert their viewers to promotional payments for products and gadgets shown on their channels, but an analysis by Princeton University researchers shows that such disclosures are rare.

The

Studying how unconventional metals behave, with an eye toward high-temperature superconductors
Dec. 12, 2018
Author
Written by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

Using laser light to trap atoms in a checkerboard-like pattern, a team led by Princeton scientists studied how resistance — the loss of electrical current as heat — can develop in unconventional metals.

The results may help explain how certain types of superconductors made from copper oxides are able to conduct electricity so…